Thursday, August 21, 2008

Nothing But A G Thang

Introduce me to someone with the last name of "Dominquez." No really, I'd love to meet him or her. A google search of "Dominquez" presents you with the question of whether you meant "Dominguez."

You probably did.

I would love to know how someone can correctly send me an email to an address including my last name BUT STILL MISSPELL MY SURNAME IN THE EMAIL. REPEATEDLY.

Read. Just read. That's all I'm asking. Maybe also apply some common sense and general knowledge gleaned from living in a largely Hispanic state.

I'm just saying.

5 comments:

Kerri said...

I have the same problem with both my first and last names (maiden and married). I find it super irritating! I always make a point of spelling people's names correctly. It really isn't that hard.

Anonymous said...

At least they didn't call you "Christina". I personally (as someone whose last name is constantly mispelled) would advise simply getting over it. The point to email is to communicate and at least the person sending you the email thought you were important enough to write to.

cd said...

I never said they didn't. And they usually do. Most often, it's a twofer: Christina Dominquez.

And the person didn't "think [I] was important enough to write to," it was a business email. So it comes off as sloppy, inattentive and unprofessional. Had it been a personal email, well, it would have been hard to get that warm, fuzzy, "someone is thinking about me" feeling if they misspelled my name, no? Couldn't have been thinking too hard.

I've certainly made similar mistakes myself in life. But most people's names aren't so ripe for massacre as mine.

Anonymous said...

Well, mine is worse. Who can ever spell Anonymous. Most people insist on a small "a" for some reason.

sarahenicholson said...

Nicholson' is hardly unknown in the modern world (think 'Jack') and yet 'Nicholls' and even 'Nickerson' have been popular 'translations' of my family name over the years. Perhaps we should give points for being deliberately contrary, it's a bit of a skill.